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dc.contributor.authorRanse, Kristen
dc.contributor.authorYates, Patsy
dc.contributor.authorCoyer, Fiona
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-13T02:55:14Z
dc.date.available2018-11-13T02:55:14Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.issn1036-7314
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.aucc.2011.04.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/381148
dc.description.abstractBackground: End-of-life care is a significant component of work in intensive care. Limited research has been undertaken on the provision of end-of-life care by nurses in the intensive care setting. The purpose of this study was to explore the end-of-life care beliefs and practices of intensive care nurses. Methods: A descriptive exploratory qualitative research approach was used to invite a convenience sample of five intensive care nurses from one hospital to participate in a semi-structured interview. Interview transcripts were analysed using an inductive coding approach. Findings: Three major categories emerged from analysis of the interviews: beliefs about end-of-life care, end-of-life care in the intensive care context and facilitating end-of-life care. The first two categories incorporated factors contributing to the end-of-life care experiences and practices of intensive care nurses. The third category captured the nurses’ end-of-life care practices. Conclusions: Despite the uncertainty and ambiguity surrounding end-of-life care in this practice context, the intensive care setting presents unique opportunities for nurses to facilitate positive end-of-life experiences and nurses valued their participation in the provision of end-of-life care. Care of the family was at the core of nurses’ end-of-life care work and nurses play a pivotal role in supporting the patient and their family to have positive and meaningful experiences at the end-of-life. Variation in personal beliefs and organisational support may influence nurses’ experiences and the care provided to patients and their families. Strategies to promote an organisational culture supportive of quality end-of-life care practices, and to mentor and support nurses in the provision of this care are needed.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom4
dc.relation.ispartofpageto12
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Critical Care
dc.relation.ispartofvolume25
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111099
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110
dc.titleEnd-of-life care in the intensive care setting: A descriptive exploratory qualitative study of nurses' beliefs and practices
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.rights.copyright© 2012 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Australia. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorRanse, Kristen


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