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dc.contributor.authorHolden, Libbyen_US
dc.contributor.authorHockey, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.authorWare, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Christinaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-14T01:30:48Z
dc.date.available2019-06-14T01:30:48Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.issn0962-9343en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11136-018-1786-7en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/381341
dc.description.abstractPurpose: We examine timing of motherhood in a longitudinal cohort of young Australian women, and its relationship with mental health-related quality of life (SF-36 MHI-5), and with sociodemographic, health behaviour and health-related variables. Methods: We analysed longitudinal self-report data from a nationally representative cohort of 10,332 Australian women born 1973–1978, surveyed 6 times between 1996 (aged 18–23) and 2012 (aged 34–39). Results: Group-based trajectory modelling identified four groups. Normative Mothers (46%, mean age at motherhood 30.5 years) made the transition to motherhood close to the Australian median age. Early Mothers (25%, 25.2 years) and Very Early Mothers (7%, 20.0 years) made this transition earlier; Not Mothers (22%) had not given birth. Generalised linear mixed models showed that all groups improved mean MHI-5 scores over time. Patterns of group differences were complex: Normative and Early Mothers scored consistently highest; Very Early Mothers scored lowest at most surveys; Not Mothers’ scores increased relative to others over time. Most effects disappeared after adjustment for confounders. Early and Very Early Mothers showed multiple indicators of social disadvantage, while Not Mothers had very low rates of marriage. Conclusions: Timing of motherhood is embedded in sociodemographic and personal contexts. Women with socioeconomic advantages were characterised by higher mental health-related quality of life and later transition to motherhood, but adjustment for relative advantage attenuated differences in mental health-related quality of life. The overall findings suggest a pattern of positive adaptation to circumstances, with mental health-related quality of life improving through early adulthood regardless of timing of motherhood.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom923en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto935en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalQuality of Life Researchen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume27en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Servicesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111799en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117en_US
dc.titleMental health-related quality of life and the timing of motherhood: a 16-year longitudinal study of a national cohort of young Australian womenen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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