Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGiles, John R
dc.contributor.authorEby, Peggy
dc.contributor.authorParry, Hazel
dc.contributor.authorPeel, Alison J
dc.contributor.authorPlowright, Raina K
dc.contributor.authorWestcott, David A
dc.contributor.authorMcCallum, Hamish
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-05T12:30:56Z
dc.date.available2019-07-05T12:30:56Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-018-27859-3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/381484
dc.description.abstractIn the Australian subtropics, flying-foxes (family Pteropididae) play a fundamental ecological role as forest pollinators. Flying-foxes are also reservoirs of the fatal zoonosis, Hendra virus. Understanding flying fox foraging ecology, particularly in agricultural areas during winter, is critical to determine their role in transmitting Hendra virus to horses and humans. We developed a spatiotemporal model of flying-fox foraging intensity based on foraging patterns of 37 grey-headed flying-foxes (Pteropus poliocephalus) using GPS tracking devices and boosted regression trees. We validated the model with independent population counts and summarized temporal patterns in terms of spatial resource concentration. We found that spatial resource concentration was highest in late-summer and lowest in winter, with lowest values in winter 2011, the same year an unprecedented cluster of spillover events occurred in Queensland and New South Wales. Spatial resource concentration was positively correlated with El Niño Southern Oscillation at 3–8 month time lags. Based on shared foraging traits with the primary reservoir of Hendra virus (Pteropus alecto), we used our results to develop hypotheses on how regional climatic history, eucalypt phenology, and foraging behaviour may contribute to the predominance of winter spillovers, and how these phenomena connote foraging habitat conservation as a public health intervention.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.sponsorshipDept of Science, Information Technology, Innovation & the Arts (DSITIA)
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofchapter9555
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto18
dc.relation.ispartofjournalScientific Reports
dc.relation.ispartofvolume8
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiochemistry and Cell Biology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOther Physical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0601
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0299
dc.titleEnvironmental drivers of spatiotemporal foraging intensity in fruit bats and implications for Hendra virus ecology
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, School of Environment and Science
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2018. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorGiles, John
gro.griffith.authorPeel, Alison J.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record