Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMartinez i Coma, Ferran
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Rodney
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-06T12:32:04Z
dc.date.available2019-07-06T12:32:04Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1036-1146
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10361146.2018.1450357
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/381677
dc.description.abstractDespite the importance of immigration to Australia, there is little systematic research on the causes of support among Australian citizens for increased, stable or decreased immigration. This paper advances our understanding of Australian public attitudes to immigration levels in the light of the established international literature on public opinion and immigration. Using 2013 Australian Electoral Study (AES) data, we show that, as in other countries, Australian citizens’ attitudes to immigrant numbers are partly driven by a combination of sociotropic economic considerations and perceptions of the socio-cultural impact of immigrants. In addition, we argue that political mobilisation has an impact on attitudes toward immigration that has not received sufficient attention. We demonstrate that citizens who accepted the Coalition's rhetoric on asylum seeker arrivals were more likely to want overall immigrant numbers reduced. Finally, we combine the individual level AES data with electoral district level data to test the impact of contact with immigrants on attitudes to immigrant numbers. Australians living in electoral districts with higher percentages of non-white immigrants are more likely to want lower immigrant numbers than those living in districts with fewer non-white immigrants.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom271
dc.relation.ispartofpageto289
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Political Science
dc.relation.ispartofvolume53
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolitical Science not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolicy and Administration
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolitical Science
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160699
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1605
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1606
dc.subject.keywordsImmigration
dc.subject.keywordsPublic opinion
dc.subject.keywordsAustralia
dc.subject.keywordsBoats
dc.titleJobs, crime, proximity and boats: explaining Australian public attitudes to immigrant numbers
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Centre for Governance and Public Policy
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Taylor & Francis (Routledge). This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Australian Journal of Political Science on 21 Mar 2018, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/10361146.2018.1450357
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMartinez Coma, Fernando


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record