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dc.contributor.authorUink, Bepen_US
dc.contributor.authorModecki, Kathrynen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarber, Bonnieen_US
dc.contributor.authorCorreia, Helenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-29T13:12:40Z
dc.date.available2019-05-29T13:12:40Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.issn1573-3327en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10578-018-0784-xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/381709
dc.description.abstractNumerous theories assert that youth with externalizing symptomatology experience intensified emotion reactivity to stressful events; yet scant empirical research has assessed this notion. Using in-vivo data collected via experience sampling methodology, we assessed whether externalizing symptoms conditioned adolescents’ emotion reactivity to daily stressors (i.e. change in emotion pre-post stressor) among 206 socioeconomically disadvantaged adolescents. We also assessed whether higher externalizing symptomology was associated with experiencing more stressors overall, and whether adolescents’ emotional upheavals resulted in experiencing a subsequent stressor. Hierarchical linear models showed that adolescents higher in externalizing symptoms experienced stronger emotion reactivity in sadness, anger, jealously, loneliness, and (dips in) excitement. Externalizing symptomatology was not associated with more stressful events, but a stress-preventative effect was found for recent upheavals in jealousy among youth low in externalizing. Findings pinpoint intense emotion reactivity to daily stress as a risk factor for youth with externalizing symptoms living in socioeconomic disadvantage.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom741en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto756en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalChild Psychiatry and Human Developmenten_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume49en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPaediatrics and Reproductive Medicine not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPaediatrics and Reproductive Medicineen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111499en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1114en_US
dc.subject.keywordsExperience Samplingen_US
dc.subject.keywordsExternalizingen_US
dc.subject.keywordsEmotion reactivityen_US
dc.subject.keywordsSocioeconomic disadvantageen_US
dc.subject.keywordsAdolescentsen_US
dc.titleSocioeconomically Disadvantaged Adolescents with Elevated Externalizing Symptoms Show Heightened Emotion Reactivity to Daily Stress: An Experience Sampling Studyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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