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dc.contributor.authorSheeran, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorCummings, Daniel J
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-29T13:13:08Z
dc.date.available2019-05-29T13:13:08Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn0018-1560
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10734-018-0253-2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/381733
dc.description.abstractEducators and researchers are increasingly interested in the benefits of using Facebook groups attached to university courses, largely around connectedness, engagement and sense of belonging. However, thus far, there have been no broad-scale investigations on the potential outcomes of course-attached Facebook groups. The current study used both within- and between-group analyses on 471 participants, in order to investigate whether courses with an attached official or unofficial Facebook group was related to increased student engagement (in the categories of relationships with faculty members, peer relationships, behavioural engagement, cognitive engagement, valuing and a sense of belonging) and degree identity compared to courses without Facebook groups. Results indicated that students reported interacting more with unofficial than official Facebook groups. Courses with an official Facebook group had significantly greater staff connectedness compared to courses without an official Facebook group, while courses with either an official or unofficial Facebook group had a significantly higher peer relationships compared to courses without any Facebook group. Students with either an official or unofficial Facebook group had a significantly higher sense of belonging. Though students with either an official or unofficial Facebook group reported higher degree identity, this may be primarily due to the unofficial, rather than official Facebook groups; this difference may only exist in the unofficial, but not the official Facebook groups.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom937
dc.relation.ispartofpageto955
dc.relation.ispartofissue6
dc.relation.ispartofjournalHigher Education
dc.relation.ispartofvolume76
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation Systems not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation Systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1301
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1303
dc.subject.keywordsFacebook
dc.subject.keywordsEngagement
dc.subject.keywordsConnectedness
dc.subject.keywordsIdentity
dc.subject.keywordsBelonging
dc.titleAn examination of the relationship between Facebook groups attac
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Springer Netherlands. This is an electronic version of an article published in Higher Education, Vol. 76 Issue 6, pp 937–955, 2018. Higher Education is available online at: http://link.springer.com// with the open URL of your article.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCummings, Dan J.
gro.griffith.authorSheeran, Nicola J.


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