Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorIfediora, CO
dc.contributor.authorAzuike, EC
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-06T01:33:02Z
dc.date.available2019-06-06T01:33:02Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn2421-4248
dc.identifier.doi10.15167/2421-4248/jpmh2018.59.4.964
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/381787
dc.description.abstractBackground: Breast cancer occurrences in developing countries are gradually matching caucasian levels. Since early detection is linked to reductions in morbidities and mortality, affordable screening techniques like breast self-examination (BSE) becomes imperative in these resource-limited economies. Ascertaining the Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices (KAP) of breast cancers and BSE among young adult females will help provide baseline information for early and targeted interventions. Method: A cross sectional survey involving 432 female senior secondary school students in Otuocha Educational Zone of Anambra State, Nigeria. Results: A total of 321(74.3%) valid questionnaires were returned. Mean age was 16.79+/-1.48 years. Even though 84.6% and 55.2% had respectively heard about breast cancer and BSE, and the ‘General Knowledge’ of breast cancer was high (75.2%), specifics on ‘Risk Factors’ (41.5%) and ‘Symptoms’ (46.1%) were poor. Knowledge on correct BSE ‘Techniques’ was 52.9%, but few know when to commence (43.1%), the right frequency (31.5%), or the right timing (24.6%). A large majority (73.6%) had positive attitudes, but only 6.1% practice it monthly, while 55.3% had never done it at all. No significant predictors of Knowledge and Practice of BSE was identified. Conclusion: Health campaigns on BSE and breast cancers should provide specific details on techniques, risk factors and symptoms, while emphasizing on the right methods, timing and frequency. The positive attitudes identified raise optimism that health interventions would be effective and can have long term benefits. If possible, BSE and breast cancer teachings should be included in the secondary school academic curricula of resource-limited countries.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherPacini Editore SpA
dc.publisher.placeItaly
dc.relation.ispartofpagefromE282
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoE300
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene
dc.relation.ispartofvolume59
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth Promotion
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111712
dc.subject.keywordsBreast self-examination
dc.subject.keywordsBSE
dc.subject.keywordsBreast cancer
dc.subject.keywordsWomen
dc.subject.keywordsSecondary schools
dc.subject.keywordsKnowledge
dc.subject.keywordsAttitude
dc.subject.keywordsPractice
dc.titleTackling breast cancer in developing countries: insights from the knowledge, attitudes and practices on breast cancer and its prevention among Nigerian teenagers in secondary schools
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Medicine
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorIfediora, Chris O.


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record