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dc.contributor.authorCrawford-Williams, Fionaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGoodwin, Belindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarch, Sonjaen_US
dc.contributor.authorIreland, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorHyde, Melissaen_US
dc.contributor.authorChambers, Suzanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorAitken, Joanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorDunn, Jeffreyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-29T13:14:35Z
dc.date.available2019-05-29T13:14:35Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.issn0941-4355en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00520-018-4218-xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382007
dc.description.abstractPurpose This study aimed to identify the factors which health professionals believe influence clinical care and outcomes for people with cancer in regional areas of Australia. Methods Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with a variety of health professionals. Interview questions explored health professional’s perspectives on barriers to cancer care for patients, factors which influence clinical care, and access to support in regional areas. Data were interpreted using an inductive thematic analysis approach. Results Two global themes were identified: rural culture and the health system. Within these global themes, health professionals discussed barriers to cancer care in regional areas, predominantly associated with travel, limited workforce, and poor communication within the health system. Participants also noted many positive aspects of cancer care in regional areas, including more personalised care for the patients and faster career progression for professionals. Conclusions Despite several strategies to improve rural cancer care in recent times, including innovative models of care and increased infrastructure, health professionals still perceive many barriers to cancer care in regional Australia. These are predominantly associated with patient demographics, travel difficulties, and inadequate governance. However, there are also many notable benefits to receiving care in regional areas which have been absent from previous literature. These positive factors should be incorporated in efforts to enhance regional cancer care through the recruitment of health professionals to regional areas and development of regional community support networks.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom3507en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto3515en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSupportive Care in Canceren_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume26en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17en_US
dc.subject.keywordsOncologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsCancer careen_US
dc.subject.keywordsRural healthen_US
dc.subject.keywordsQualitativeen_US
dc.subject.keywordsHealth professionalsen_US
dc.titleCancer care in regional Australia from the health professional's perspectiveen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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