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dc.contributor.authorHale, Robin
dc.contributor.authorColeman, Rhys
dc.contributor.authorSievers, Michael
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Timothy R
dc.contributor.authorSwearer, Stephen E
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-06T01:33:17Z
dc.date.available2019-06-06T01:33:17Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn2150-8925
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ecs2.2381
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382025
dc.description.abstractUrban stormwater treatment wetlands are constructed to treat stormwater runoff before it enters waterways, but are often inhabited by animals that can suffer impairments. Such effects will be exacerbated if animals mistakenly prefer sites where their fitness is reduced, and are caught in ecological traps. Traps can compromise the persistence of threatened species in urban landscapes, so assessing how animals respond to stormwater wetlands, and whether their fitness varies between stormwater and natural wetlands, can guide management efforts. We examined the habitat selection behavior of dwarf galaxias (Galaxiella pusilla), a threatened freshwater fish inhabiting wetlands and streams around Melbourne, Australia. We tested whether fish respond to cues that could indicate habitat quality, and whether they can differentiate between water from stormwater and non‐stormwater wetlands. We also tested whether fitness (e.g., survival, development) was lower at stormwater wetlands. Fish responded weakly to cues and did not avoid stormwater wetlands. Survival was lower at stormwater wetlands, and fish suffered delayed ovarian maturation, potentially due to a lack of food. Thus, stormwater wetlands can be equal‐preference ecological traps for G. pusilla, a key finding with direct implications for conservation. For highly dispersive species that are not selective about habitats, managing ecological traps requires a whole‐of‐landscape approach, with consideration given to where wetlands are constructed. Given the investment required to remediate existing ecological traps, this approach can also identify priority wetlands for intervention. We discuss our results in the context of how insights from animal behavior can inform threatened species conservation in fragmented urban landscapes.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherEcological Society of America
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto13
dc.relation.ispartofissue8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEcosphere
dc.relation.ispartofvolume9
dc.subject.fieldofresearchFreshwater Ecology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcological Applications
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchZoology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060204
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050205
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0501
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0608
dc.titleUsing conservation behavior to manage ecological traps for a threatened freshwater fish
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Hale, Robin, et. al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSievers, Michael K.


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