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dc.contributor.authorDasgupta, Paramita
dc.contributor.authorAitken, Joanne F
dc.contributor.authorPyke, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorBaade, Peter D
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-29T13:14:54Z
dc.date.available2019-05-29T13:14:54Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn0960-9776
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.breast.2018.07.005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382076
dc.description.abstractBackground: Understanding the burden of competing (non-breast cancer) mortality is important for the growing number of breast cancer survivors. We quantity these patterns, and the impact of two leading non-cancer causes of death, within ten years of breast cancer diagnosis. Methods: Population based cancer registry study of 23,809 women aged 50–79 diagnosed with first primary breast cancer in Queensland, Australia, 1997 to 2012 with additional data linkage to identify individual non-cancer mortality causes. Flexible parametric competing-risks models were used to estimate the crude and adjusted probabilities of death. Results: While overall mortality increased with age at diagnosis, this effect was strongest for non-cancer (such as cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease) mortality. Women diagnosed with advanced breast cancer had a higher crude probability of breast cancer death (23.1% versus 4.5% for localised) but similar probability of competing mortality (11.6% versus 11.3%). Within each category of spread of disease, the probability of breast-cancer deaths remained relatively constant with age, while the probability of competing deaths increased. The 10-year probability of dying from breast cancer was 3.7%, 4.2% and 5.6% among women with localised disease aged 50 to 59, 60–69 and 70–79 respectively, but 3.1%, 7.8% and 22.9% for competing mortality. Increasing age, advanced disease and being unpartnered were independently associated with increased risk of breast cancer and competing deaths. Conclusions: Promotion of improved health behaviors after a cancer diagnosis and development of individualized strategies for clinical management should be prioritized as part of optimal care for breast cancer survivors.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom113
dc.relation.ispartofpageto119
dc.relation.ispartofjournalThe Breast
dc.relation.ispartofvolume41
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110399
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleCompeting mortality risks among women aged 50-79 years when diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, Queensland, 1997-2012
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBaade, Peter D.
gro.griffith.authorAitken, Joanne
gro.griffith.authorDasgupta, Paramita


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