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dc.contributor.authorHughes, Lynda J
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Amy NB
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Marion L
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-08T01:31:18Z
dc.date.available2019-06-08T01:31:18Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1322-7696
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.colegn.2018.07.010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382098
dc.description.abstractBackground: Competence assessment has become the accepted modality of assessing practice based disciplines, such as nursing. However, assessment of clinical competence remains a challenge for assessors. Aim: This study sought to describe assessors’ experiences of grading undergraduate students’ performances in clinical courses when that performance is marginal; not a clear pass or fail. Methods: Fourteen semi-structured interviews and two focus groups were undertaken with university employed assessors from a pre-registration bachelor of nursing programme at a multi-campus Australian university. Findings: Thematic analysis identified two distinct theme themes from the textual data: ‘human influences’ and ‘organisational processes’. The first theme of human influences was reported elsewhere. ‘Organisational processes’, including three emerging themes:time demands and pressures; assessment processes and learning and teaching practices, were identified as key impacts on assessors’ experiences of grading student clinical performances and is addressed in this paper. The impact of organisational policies and processes on the assessor around workload, teaching and learning practices and assessment processes were significant to assessors. Discussion: Tertiary assessment processes were found to significantly influence, both in a positive and negative manner, assessors’ experiences of grading student performances in clinical courses. Provision of a holistic approach to clinical assessment that includes robust assessor support measures should be developed and implemented to enhance student success and assist assessors to meet their professional responsibilities. Conclusion: Tertiary institutions play a key role in supporting effective and meaningful assessment of clinical programme components. Through understanding the significance of the organisations’ role, key stakeholders can start to examine and enact measures to bolster the enabling factors and reduce the barriers to assessing student performances that are not a clear pass or fail.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCollegian
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111003
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110
dc.titleHow organisational processes influence assessors' experiences of marginal students' performances in clinical assessments
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMitchell, Marion L.
gro.griffith.authorJohnston, Amy N.
gro.griffith.authorHughes, Lynda J.


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