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dc.contributor.authorBrown, Catherine A
dc.contributor.authorYoulden, Danny R
dc.contributor.authorAitken, Joanne F
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Andrew S
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-07T01:44:06Z
dc.date.available2019-06-07T01:44:06Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1545-5009
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pbc.27410
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382185
dc.description.abstractBackground Therapy‐related acute myeloid leukemia (t‐AML) is defined as AML that develops after exposure to cytotoxic chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. There is a paucity of available literature, particularly in regard to t‐AML following childhood cancer. Our aim was to describe the risk of t‐AML among children treated for other cancers and their subsequent survival. Procedure We utilized data from the population‐based Australian Childhood Cancer Registry to examine all childhood patients (<15 years at diagnosis) treated with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for cancers other than AML who received a subsequent diagnosis of AML between 1983 and 2014. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to approximate the relative risk of being diagnosed with AML compared to the general population. Estimates of 5‐year observed survival were obtained using the Kaplan‐Meier method, with differences determined by the log‐rank test. Results Fifty‐eight of 11,753 patients in the study cohort (0.5%) were diagnosed with t‐AML, an almost 50‐fold higher risk than expected (SIR = 45.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 35.3‐59.0). Five‐year observed survival from the date of t‐AML diagnosis was 31.2% (95% CI = 19.6‐43.5%). A significant survival advantage was found for patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) following diagnosis of t‐AML, with a 5‐year survival of 52.4% (29.7‐70.9%) compared to 5.7% (0.4‐22.6%) for those who did not have HSCT (P < 0.001). Conclusions Although rare, t‐AML is an important potential late effect of childhood cancer therapy. Prognosis is generally poor, with HSCT offering some survival benefit.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto7
dc.relation.ispartofissue12
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPediatric Blood & Cancer
dc.relation.ispartofvolume65
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOncology and Carcinogenesis
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPaediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110399
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1112
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1114
dc.subject.keywordsAustralia
dc.subject.keywordsPopulation‐based
dc.subject.keywordsRelative risk
dc.subject.keywordsSurvival
dc.subject.keywordsTherapy‐related acute myeloid leukemia
dc.titleTherapy-related acute myeloid leukemia following treatment for cancer in childhood: A population-based registry study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Wiley Periodicals Inc. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia following treatment for cancer in childhood: A population-based registry study, Pediatric Blood & Cancer, Vol. 65, issue 12, pp. e27410-1 - e27410-7, 2018., which has been published in final form at 10.1002/pbc.27410. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorAitken, Joanne
gro.griffith.authorYoulden, Danny R.


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