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dc.contributor.authorBowden, Bradleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorStevenson-Clarke, Petaen_US
dc.contributor.editorGreg Patmore and Shelton Stromquisten_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-05T01:30:47Z
dc.date.available2019-02-05T01:30:47Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9780252041839en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382296
dc.description.abstractRailroads played a seminal role in shaping Australian and US society during the nineteenth century's closing decades. In the Australian colonies, where railroads differed from most other New World societies in that they were state-­owned monopolies, railroads connected agricultural and pastoral activities in the interior with national and international markets. In the American West, as Arthur Hadley recorded in 18851 privately owned railroads reached "out in all directions to collect grain for the great western markets."' By 18901 however, interest payments were consuming a disproportionate share of railroad revenue almost everywhere. As finances deteriorated, wage labor came under attack. In the United States, the 1894 Pullman Boycott represented the culmination of what Shelton Stromquist calls an "unprecedented" period of railroad labor conflict! In this· momentous struggle, adherence to the militant American Railway Union-whose strongest support was among semiskilled workers in the American West-was effectively destroyed, leaving only the conservative railroad brotherhoods as representatives of organized labor. Australian railroad workers also suffered. In Victoria, one politician observed in 1893 that "never before" had such a "revision" of staffing been imposed. By 18971 Victorian railway employment was down 39.6 percent from its 1890 peak..3 In Queensland, wages dropped by as much as 30 percent in 1893.4en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Illinois Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.press.uillinois.edu/books/catalog/48zkp2pr9780252041839.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleFrontiers of Labor: Comparative Histories of the United States and Australiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapter9en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom191en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto208en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBusiness and Management not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150399en_US
dc.titleCauses of Railroad Labor Conflict: The Case of Queensland, Australia, and the Northern US Plains, 1880-1900en_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Book Chapters (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeB - Book Chaptersen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Dept of Employment Relations and Human Resourcesen_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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