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dc.contributor.authorGarcia-Diaz, Pablo
dc.contributor.authorKerezsy, Adam
dc.contributor.authorUnmack, Peter J
dc.contributor.authorLintermans, Mark
dc.contributor.authorBeatty, Stephen J
dc.contributor.authorButler, Gavin L
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, Rob
dc.contributor.authorHammer, Michael P
dc.contributor.authorHardie, Scott
dc.contributor.authorKennard, Mark J
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, David L
dc.contributor.authorPusey, Bradley J
dc.contributor.authorRaadik, Tarmo A
dc.contributor.authorThiem, Jason D
dc.contributor.authorWhiterod, Nick S
dc.contributor.authorCassey, Phillip
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Richard P
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-04T12:32:49Z
dc.date.available2019-07-04T12:32:49Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1366-9516
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ddi.12777
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382358
dc.description.abstractAim: Changing preferences regarding which species humans have transported to new regions can have major consequences for the potential distribution of alien taxa, but the mechanisms shaping these patterns are poorly understood. We assessed the extent to which changes in human preferences for transporting and introducing alien freshwater fishes have altered their biogeography. Location: Australia. Methods: We compiled an up‐to‐date database of alien freshwater fishes established in drainages in Australia before and after the number of established alien fish species doubled (pre‐1970 and post‐1970, respectively). Using metacommunity models, we analysed the influence of species traits and drainage features on the distribution of alien fishes that established pre‐ and post‐1970. Results: Alien fishes in Australia were introduced via four main transport pathways: acclimatization, aquaculture, biocontrol and ornamental trade. The relative importance of each pathway changed substantially between the two periods, accompanied by changes in the distribution of alien fishes and the variables predicting their distribution. Pre‐1970, most species (64%) were introduced by acclimatization societies for purposes such as angling and biocontrol, and these fish have established in inland drainages more heavily impacted by human activities. In contrast, most of the post‐1970 introductions (69%) were ornamental fishes, with most species established in small, north‐eastern, tropical and subtropical coastal drainages.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1405
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1415
dc.relation.ispartofissue10
dc.relation.ispartofjournalDiversity and Distributions
dc.relation.ispartofvolume24
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInvasive Species Ecology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode05
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.titleTransport pathways shape the biogeography of alien freshwater fishes in Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Transport pathways shape the biogeography of alien freshwater fishes in Australia, Diversity and Distributions, Volume 24, Issue 10, which has been published in final form at 10.1111/ddi.12777. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorKennard, Mark J.
gro.griffith.authorPusey, Bradley J.


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