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dc.contributor.authorAppleby, Rob
dc.contributor.authorMackie, Jess
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Bradley
dc.contributor.authorBernede, Lilia
dc.contributor.authorJones, Darryl
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-29T13:16:19Z
dc.date.available2019-05-29T13:16:19Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn0310-0049
dc.identifier.doi10.1071/AM16026
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382364
dc.description.abstractWild predators that attack people represent a significant challenge to the management authorities charged with conserving populations whilst minimising human safety risk. Fraser Island is home to an iconic population of dingoes (Canis dingo). However, conflict stemming from negative human–dingo interactions (incidents), some resulting in serious human injury and in one case, a fatality, is an ongoing concern. In an effort to highlight important factors influencing incident dynamics, we investigated the most serious incident reports gathered by the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service for the period 2001–15. We found a consistent pattern of incidents peaking in March/April and also July, corresponding with dingo breeding and whelping seasons (respectively). Monthly vehicle permit numbers (a proxy for visitation) were not positively correlated with incident rates, except during the breeding season. Male dingoes, particularly subadult males, featured heavily in incidents. Despite the fatality being highly publicised and the advent of copious on-site warning messages and other management interventions, serious incidents continue to occur annually, including some involving children. This suggests that risks are either not always understood, or are otherwise being ignored. While our results demonstrate that dingoes generally pose minimal risk to humans, some risk remains, particularly where poorly supervised children are concerned.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom146
dc.relation.ispartofpageto156
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Mammalogy
dc.relation.ispartofvolume40
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchZoology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Science and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050299
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0608
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0502
dc.titleHuman-dingo interactions on Fraser Island: an analysis of serious incident reports
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, School of Environment and Science
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 CSIRO. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorJones, Darryl N.
gro.griffith.authorAppleby, Rob G.
gro.griffith.authorMackie, Jessica A.
gro.griffith.authorBernede, Lilia


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