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dc.contributor.authorFitzGerald, Gerry
dc.contributor.authorToloo, Ghasem Sam
dc.contributor.authorBaniahmadi, Sara
dc.contributor.authorCrompton, David
dc.contributor.authorTong, Shilu
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-02T04:53:56Z
dc.date.available2019-04-02T04:53:56Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1324-1540
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382384
dc.description.abstractDevastating floods in southeast Queensland in 2011 were the combination of flash flooding in the Lockyer Valley with riverine flooding in the Brisbane metropolitan area. While there is considerable information about the immediate impact on those affected, there is less understanding of the long-term health effects that follow such events. This study explored the perceptions of health effects and support received by people affected by the 2011 southeast Queensland flood six years after the event. A cross-sectional survey of 327 people was conducted in areas affected by the floods. The questionnaire sought information about the ongoing social, economic, demographic and self-declared physical and mental health effects. The data were analysed through comparison of those unaffected with those directly affected by the floods. Residents whose households were flooded were more likely to score their health negatively than non-affected residents and had higher reported rates of trauma, injury and mental illness. Twenty-six per cent of this group reported that they still experience some adverse health effects from the floods. Managing the long-term health implications of a flood-affected population is an important public policy task. Dissatisfaction with recovery operations and perceived injustices associated with insurance and compensation arrangements may aggravate health consequences. Early recognition and intervention may assist with reducing secondary effects.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherEmergency Management Australia
dc.publisher.urihttps://knowledge.aidr.org.au/resources/ajem-january-2019/
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom35
dc.relation.ispartofpageto40
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Emergency Management
dc.relation.ispartofvolume34
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolicy and Administration
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCommunication and Media Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode179999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1605
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2001
dc.titleLong-term consequences of flooding: a case study of the 2011 Queensland floods
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2019. This is an open access Article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCrompton, David R.


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