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dc.contributor.authorHibbert, Peter
dc.contributor.authorStephens, Jacqueline H
dc.contributor.authorde Wet, Carl
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Helena
dc.contributor.authorHallahan, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorWheaton, Gavin R
dc.contributor.authorDalton, Chris
dc.contributor.authorTing, Hsuen P
dc.contributor.authorArnolda, Gaston
dc.contributor.authorBraithwaite, Jeffrey
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-07T01:44:40Z
dc.date.available2019-06-07T01:44:40Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0194-5998
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0194599818796137
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382409
dc.description.abstractObjective: The aims of this study were twofold: (1) to design and validate a set of clinical indicators of appropriate care for tonsillitis and (2) to measure the level of tonsillitis care that is in line with guideline recommendations in a sample of Australian children. Study Design: A set of tonsillitis care indicators was developed from available national and international guidelines and validated in 4 stages. This research used the same design as the CareTrack Kids study, which was described in detail elsewhere. Setting: Samples of patient records from general practices, emergency departments, and hospital admissions were assessed. Subjects and Methods: Patient records of children aged 0 to 15 years were assessed for the presence of, and adherence to, the indicators for care delivered in 2012 and 2013. Results: Eleven indicators were developed. The records of 821 children (mean age, 5.0 years; SD, 4.0) with tonsillitis were screened. The reviewers conducted 2354 eligible indicator assessments across 1127 visits. Adherence to 6 indicators could be assessed and ranged from 14.3% to 73.2% (interquartile range 31.5% to 72.2%). Conclusion: Our main findings are consistent with the international literature: the treatment of many children who present with confirmed or suspected tonsillitis is inconsistent with current guidelines. Future research should consider how the indicators could be applied in a structured and automated manner to increase the reliability and efficiency of record reviews and help raise clinicians’ awareness of appropriate tonsillitis management.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSage Publications Inc.
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom137
dc.relation.ispartofpageto144
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalOtolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
dc.relation.ispartofvolume160
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3202
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode320299
dc.titleAssessing the Quality of the Management of Tonsillitis among Australian Children: A Population-Based Sample Survey
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorde Wet, Carl


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