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dc.contributor.authorBretag, Tracey
dc.contributor.authorHarper, Rowena
dc.contributor.authorBurton, Michael
dc.contributor.authorEllis, Cath
dc.contributor.authorNewton, Philip
dc.contributor.authorvan Haeringen, Karen
dc.contributor.authorSaddiqui, Sonia
dc.contributor.authorRozenberg, Pearl
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-05T12:33:10Z
dc.date.available2019-07-05T12:33:10Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0260-2938
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02602938.2018.1527892
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382469
dc.description.abstractThis paper reports on findings from a large Australian research project that explored the relationship between contract cheating and assessment design. Using survey responses from 14,086 students and 1147 educators at eight universities, a multivariate analysis examined the influence of a range of factors on the likelihood that different assessment types would prompt considerations of contract cheating in students. Perceptions of likelihood were highest among students who speak a language other than English at home. Perceptions of likelihood were also higher among students who reported there to be lots of opportunities to cheat, and amongst students who were dissatisfied with the teaching and learning environment. Perceptions of likelihood for certain assessment types were also higher in commerce and engineering than in any other discipline. Overall, four assessment types were perceived by students to be the least likely to be outsourced, however these are also the least likely to be set by educators. The analysis indicates that educators are more likely to use these assessment tasks when they report positively on organisational support for teaching and learning.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Education and Training
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto17
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAssessment & Evaluation in Higher Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode139999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode13
dc.titleContract cheating and assessment design: exploring the relationship
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorvan Haeringen, Karen A.


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