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dc.contributor.authorJackson, LA
dc.contributor.authorTomlinson, R
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T12:33:00Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T12:33:00Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.isbn9781922107916
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382505
dc.description.abstractIn the 50 years since the 1967 erosion events coastal management on the Gold Coast has evolved significantly with improvements in coastal management knowledge, tools and technology. The paper reviews the history and evolution of coastal management on the Gold Coast, with the two keystones being terminal seawalls and nourishment. The 1967 erosion forced the Gold Coast to value and protect its beaches and coastal development. The 1st priority was protection of public and private assets. Erosion measures varied considerably and included dumped sand, clay / shale, sandbags, concrete and old car bodies. Construction of engineered rock seawalls designed by the Qld Co-ordinator Generals Department started in late 1967 along public foreshore areas. Subsequently, the 1970 “Delft Report” provided the first erosion management plan. This report recommended mass nourishment with structures such as groynes to stabilise the wider beaches. A Scheme of Works was gazetted in 1972 by the State for implementation by Council. The first mass nourishment commenced in 1974. Council recognised the need for a continuous terminal wall to protect property while the nourishment was progressively funded and implemented over a long-time frame. Supporting policies to encourage private participation were introduced by Council and after 50 years, methods and policies have been evolved and implemented using IENCE (Infrastructure to Enhance the Natural Capacity of the Environment) principles. The strategy of mass nourishment seaward of terminal seawalls has proved successful as has been demonstrated again recently in the large swells in June 2016 that caused widespread erosion along the east coast of Australia. Further major nourishment works are proposed for 2017. This paper reviews the evolution of coastal management on the Gold Coast with improvements in coastal management knowledge, tools and technology.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherEngineers Australia
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttps://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=930119103026763;res=IELENG
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameAustralasian Coasts and Ports Conference 2017
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleAustralasian Coasts and Ports 2017 Conference
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2017-06-21
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2017-06-23
dc.relation.ispartoflocationCairns, Australia
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom640
dc.relation.ispartofpageto645
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCivil Engineering not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050205
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode090599
dc.title50 Years of Seawall and Nourishment Strategy Evolution on the Gold Coast
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conferences
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publications
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2017. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference’s website or contact the author(s).
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorTomlinson, Rodger B.


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