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dc.contributor.authorCrilly, Julia
dc.contributor.authorSweeny, Amy
dc.contributor.authorO'Dwyer, John
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Brent
dc.contributor.authorGreen, David
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Andrea P
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-08T01:42:09Z
dc.date.available2019-06-08T01:42:09Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1742-6731
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1742-6723.13123
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382669
dc.description.abstractObjective: Timely and appropriate assessment and management within the ED impacts patient outcomes including in‐hospital mortality and length of stay (LOS). Within the ED, several processes facilitate timely recognition of the need for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. This study describes characteristics and outcomes for patient presentations admitted to ICU from ED, categorised by Australasian Triage Score (ATS), ICU admission time and ICU admission source. Methods: A retrospective observational cohort study with linked health data of adult ICU admissions during 2012. Outcomes measured included: ED, ICU and hospital LOS, time to see ED clinician, ICU readmission and ICU and hospital mortality rates. Results: In total, 423 ICU admissions occurred within 24 h of ED arrival; 395 were admitted directly to ICU; 28 were admitted to the ward before ICU admission. ATS 3/4/5 patients comprised 26.7% of ICU admissions and experienced longer waits to be seen, longer total ED LOS, shorter ICU LOS and a lower mortality rate than those triaged ATS 1/2. Compared to ICU admissions during business hours, admissions outside hours did not differ significantly for any outcome measured. Patients admitted to the ward before ICU experienced longer waits to be seen and longer ED LOS. Conclusion: Most patients are appropriately identified in ED as requiring ICU admission, although around one in four were triaged ATS 3/4. Patients admitted to the ward first tended to have poorer outcomes than those directly admitted to ICU. Factors predicting the need for ICU admission should be identified to support clinical decision‐making.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto9
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEmergency Medicine Australasia
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110399
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titlePatients admitted via the emergency department to the intensive care unit: An observational cohort study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorCrilly, Julia
gro.griffith.authorMarshall, Andrea
gro.griffith.authorGreen, David W.
gro.griffith.authorRichards, Brent V.
gro.griffith.authorSweeny, Amy L.


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