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dc.contributor.advisorLu, Junwei
dc.contributor.advisorStegen, Sascha
dc.contributor.authorLeskarac, Dom
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-29T07:10:18Z
dc.date.available2019-03-29T07:10:18Z
dc.date.issued2018-11
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/642
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382735
dc.description.abstractThis thesis presents a hybrid AC/DC microgrid (H-MG) topology that integrates bidirectional, four-quadrant, static synchronous compensators (STATCOMs), high voltage lithium-based energy storage and managed, high-frequency, step-up DC/DC solar converters. Using this topology, an actual H-MG was built and studied to find an efficient solution to peak-demand energy management, increase renewable/distributed energy penetration, and support electric vehicle (EV) integration with commercial buildings. An H-MG testing facility was constructed in a test building at Griffith University to assess and integrate the different elements involved in constructing distribution architectures that combine both AC- and DC-based electrical networks. The facility comprised a total of 15.5 kW of reconfigurable solar photo-voltaic (PV) modules and 80 kWh of reconfigurable lithium energy storage with a variable, 145 kVA, unbalanced, three-phase, commercial building load. The DC element in the H-MG was formed by a combination of managed DC/DC converters and a lithium battery module. The base parameters of the DC bus were dependent on the AC component of the network, as a single- or three-phase AC supply determined the base DC bus voltage. The base DC bus voltage then deviated based upon the state of charge (SoC) of the lithium battery. Managed solar PV DC/DC converters were placed in parallel and set to follow the SoC voltage characteristics of the lithium battery. The DC/DC converters utilised maximum power point tracking (MPPT) and were placed in parallel to provide direct distributed generation charging functionality for the battery. A STATCOM was directly connected to the DC bus, enabling four-quadrant operation to improve power quality and reduce the peak demand of the building. Utilising both high-power AC and DC, plug-in EVs (PEV) can be a burden or benefit to electricity networks. Using vehicle-to-grid (V2G) connectivity, a PEV can perform similar power quality and peak demand reduction functionality if a bi-directional AC or DC connection is present. This research successfully implemented and operated a managed DC/AC hybrid microgrid with a four-quadrant STATCOM and DC/DC coupled solar PV array on a commercial building at Griffith University. The system provided voltage regulation and a unity power factor in the connected phase during different modes of strategic operation. Power factor control of the building was also achieved during both discharging and charging of the connected energy storage system.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.subject.keywordsEnergy storage
dc.subject.keywordsSmart microgrids
dc.subject.keywordsSTATCOMs
dc.subject.keywordsVoltage regulation
dc.subject.keywordsUnity power factor
dc.titleInvestigation of STATCOMs and Energy Storage Systems in Smart Microgrids
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyScience, Environment, Engineering and Technology
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorWishart, Michael
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
gro.departmentSchool of Eng & Built Env
gro.griffith.authorLeskarac, Dom


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