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dc.contributor.authorTan, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorCvetkovski, Biljana
dc.contributor.authorKritikos, Vicky
dc.contributor.authorYan, Kwok
dc.contributor.authorPrice, David
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Peter
dc.contributor.authorBosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-19T04:15:33Z
dc.date.available2019-08-19T04:15:33Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1885-642X
dc.identifier.doi10.18549/PharmPract.2018.03.1332
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382755
dc.description.abstractBackground: Community pharmacists have a key role to play in the management of allergic rhinitis (AR). Their role is especially important because the majority of medications used to treat AR are available for purchase over-the-counter (OTC), allowing patients to self-select their own medications and bypass the pharmacists. Patients’ self-selection often results in suboptimal treatment selection, undertreated AR and poor clinical outcomes. In order for pharmacists to optimise the care for AR patients in the pharmacy, pharmacists need to be able to identify patient cohorts who self-select and are at high risk of mismanagement. Objectives: This study aimed to compare the demographics, clinical characteristics and medication selected, between pharmacy customers who choose to self-select and those who speak with a pharmacist when purchasing medication for their AR in a community pharmacy and identify factors associated with AR patients’ medication(s) self-selection behaviour. Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was conducted in a convenience sample of community pharmacies from the Sydney metropolitan area. Demographics, pattern of AR symptoms, their impact on quality of life (QOL) and medication(s) selected, were collected. Logistic regressions were used to identify factors associated with participants’ medication self-selection behaviour. Results: Of the 296 recruited participants, 202 were identified with AR; 67.8% were female, 54.5% were >40 years of age, 64.9% had a doctor’s diagnosis of AR, and 69.3% self-selected medication(s). Participants with AR who self-select were 4 times more likely to experience moderate-severe wheeze (OR 4.047, 95% CI 1.155-14.188) and almost 0.4 times less likely to experience an impact of AR symptoms on their QOL (OR 0.369, 95% CI 0.188-0.727). Conclusions: The factors associated with AR patients’ self-selecting medication(s) are the presence of wheeze and the absence of impact on their QOL due to AR symptoms. By identifying this cohort of patients, our study highlights an opportunity for pharmacists to engage these patients and encourage discussion about their AR and asthma management.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherCentro de Investigaciones y Publicaciones Farmaceuticas
dc.relation.ispartoflocationSpain
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1332
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPharmacy Practice
dc.relation.ispartofvolume16
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1115
dc.titleManagement of allergic rhinitis in the community pharmacy: Identifying the reasons behind medication self-selection
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Pharmacy Practice and the Authors. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY-NC-ND) that allows others to share the work with an acknowledgement of the work's authorship and initial publication in this journal.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSmith, Peter K.


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