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dc.contributor.authorSosa-Hernandez, Juan Eduardo
dc.contributor.authorVillalba-Rodriguez, Angel M
dc.contributor.authorRomero-Castillo, Kenya D
dc.contributor.authorAguilar-Aguila-Isaias, Mauricio A
dc.contributor.authorGarcia-Reyes, Isaac E
dc.contributor.authorHernandez-Antonio, Arturo
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Ishtiaq
dc.contributor.authorSharma, Ashutosh
dc.contributor.authorParra-Saldivar, Roberto
dc.contributor.authorIqbal, Hafiz MN
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-19T13:03:09Z
dc.date.available2019-06-19T13:03:09Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn2072-666X
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/mi9100536
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382772
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, ever-increasing scientific knowledge and modern high-tech advancements in micro- and nano-scales fabrication technologies have impacted significantly on various scientific fields. A micro-level approach so-called “microfluidic technology” has rapidly evolved as a powerful tool for numerous applications with special reference to bioengineering and biomedical engineering research. Therefore, a transformative effect has been felt, for instance, in biological sample handling, analyte sensing cell-based assay, tissue engineering, molecular diagnostics, and drug screening, etc. Besides such huge multi-functional potentialities, microfluidic technology also offers the opportunity to mimic different organs to address the complexity of animal-based testing models effectively. The combination of fluid physics along with three-dimensional (3-D) cell compartmentalization has sustained popularity as organ-on-a-chip. In this context, simple humanoid model systems which are important for a wide range of research fields rely on the development of a microfluidic system. The basic idea is to provide an artificial testing subject that resembles the human body in every aspect. For instance, drug testing in the pharma industry is crucial to assure proper function. Development of microfluidic-based technology bridges the gap between in vitro and in vivo models offering new approaches to research in medicine, biology, and pharmacology, among others. This is also because microfluidic-based 3-D niche has enormous potential to accommodate cells/tissues to create a physiologically relevant environment, thus, bridge/fill in the gap between extensively studied animal models and human-based clinical trials. This review highlights principles, fabrication techniques, and recent progress of organs-on-chip research. Herein, we also point out some opportunities for microfluidic technology in the future research which is still infancy to accurately design, address and mimic the in vivo niche.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.relation.ispartofissue10
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMICROMACHINES
dc.relation.ispartofvolume9
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNanotechnology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNanotechnology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode100799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1007
dc.titleOrgans-on-a-Chip Module: A Review from the Development and Applications Perspective
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorAhmed, Ishtiaq


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