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dc.contributor.authorMacdonald, Libby
dc.contributor.authorTrembath, David
dc.contributor.authorAshburner, Jill
dc.contributor.authorCostley, Debra
dc.contributor.authorKeen, Deb
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-20T06:44:32Z
dc.date.available2020-01-20T06:44:32Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1471-3802
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1471-3802.12409
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/382786
dc.description.abstractApparent differences in executive function can lead to challenges for students on the autism spectrum in mainstream settings. Difficulties with staying on‐task and transitioning between tasks and task elements can interfere with students’ participation in educational activities and lead to stress and anxiety. While the use of visual supports, such as visual schedules and work systems, has been shown to be effective in supporting students to stay on‐task in special education and autism‐specific settings, there is little research to support the use of these strategies by teachers in mainstream classrooms. This study evaluated the use of visual schedules and work systems in supporting four students on the autism spectrum to stay on‐task and work independently in a mainstream setting. These strategies were implemented by teachers as inclusive practices, and evaluated using observations within the natural classroom environment to examine their feasibility in mainstream settings. All participants demonstrated improvements in on‐task behaviours. Results for other, secondary, dependent variables were mixed, with some students showing reduced off‐task behaviours and increased productivity. The implications for clinical practice and future research directions are discussed.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley Blackwell
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom254
dc.relation.ispartofpageto266
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Research in Special Educational Needs
dc.relation.ispartofvolume18
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1303
dc.titleThe use of visual schedules and work systems to increase the on-task behaviour of students on the autism spectrum in mainstream classrooms
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 NASEN. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: The use of visual schedules and work systems to increase the on‐task behaviour of students on the autism spectrum in mainstream classrooms, Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, Volume 18, Issue 4, Pages 254-266, 2018, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/1471-3802.12409. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorTrembath, David
gro.griffith.authorKeen, Deb A.
gro.griffith.authorMacdonald, Libby


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