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dc.contributor.authorZhu, Rong
dc.contributor.authorGray, Darren J
dc.contributor.authorThrift, Aaron P
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Gail M
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yi
dc.contributor.authorQiu, Dong-Chuan
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Feng
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yue-Sheng
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Jiagang
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Hong-Qing
dc.contributor.authorWu, Wei-Ping
dc.contributor.authorLi, Robert S
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, Donald P
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:01:26Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:01:26Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.modified2013-11-11T22:39:26Z
dc.identifier.issn1756-3305
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1756-3305-4-43
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/38287
dc.description.abstractBackground Schistosoma japonicum is a major public health concern in the Peoples' Republic of China (PRC), with over one million people infected and another 50 million living in areas at risk of infection. Based on ecological, environmental, population genetic and molecular factors, schistosomiasis transmission in PRC can be categorised into four discrete ecosystems or transmission modes. It is predicted that the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) will impact upon the transmission of schistosomiasis in the PRC, with varying degree across the four transmission modes. We undertook longitudinal surveillance from 2002 to 2006 in sentinel villages both above and below the TGD across five provinces (Hunan, Jiangxi, Hubei, Anhui and Sichuan) to determine whether there was any impact of the TGD on schistosomiasis transmission during its construction. Here we present the results from a schistosomiasis-endemic village located above the dam in Sichuan Province. Results Baseline results showed a human S. japonicum prevalence of 42.0% (95% CI: 36.6-47.5). At follow-up, results showed that the incidence of S. japonicum infection in the selected human cohort in Shian decreased by three quarters from 46% in 2003 to 11.3% in 2006. A significant (P < 0.01) downward trend was also evident in the yearly adjusted (for water contact) odds ratios. Over the four years of follow-up, the incidence of S. japonicum infection in bovines declined from 11.8% in the first year to zero in the final year of follow-up. Conclusions The substantial decrease in human (75%) and bovine (100%) incidence observed in Shian village can probably be attributed to the annual human and bovine PZQ treatment of positives; as seen in drug (PZQ) intervention studies in other parts of PRC. If an increase in schistosome transmission had occurred as a result of the TGD, it would be of negligible size compared to the treatment induced decline seen here. It appears therefore that the construction of the TGD had virtually no impact on schistosomiasis transmission in Shian village over the period of study. Furthermore, contrary to previous reports from Sichuan downplaying the role of animals in human schistosome transmission, bovines may indeed play a role.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent1953390 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom43-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto43-8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalParasites & Vectors
dc.relation.ispartofvolume4
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical microbiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEpidemiology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3207
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode420299
dc.titleA 5-year longitudinal study of schistosomiasis transmission in Shian village, the Anning River Valley, Sichuan Province, the Peoples’ Republic of China
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0
gro.description.notepublicPage numbers are not for citation purposes. Instead, this article has the unique article number of 4:43.
gro.rights.copyright© 2010 Zhu et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.date.issued2011
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorGray, Darren
gro.griffith.authorMcManus, Don P.


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