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dc.contributor.authorLenton, Gavin K
dc.contributor.authorSaxby, David J
dc.contributor.authorLloyd, David G
dc.contributor.authorBilling, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorHiggs, Jeremy
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, Tim LA
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-07T01:34:58Z
dc.date.available2019-06-07T01:34:58Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1440-2440
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jsams.2018.06.013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/383037
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To determine the effects of different body armour types, carried loads, and walking speeds on trunk and lower-limb joint biomechanics. Design: Within-subjects repeated measures to determine the effects of different body armour types, carried loads, and walking speeds on trunk and lower-limb joint biomechanics. Methods: Twenty soldiers (29.5 ± 7.1yrs) completed a treadmill walking protocol in an unloaded (baseline) condition and wearing a control, Tiered Body Armour System (TBAS) and five different armour types (cARM1-2, pARM1) with two load configurations (15 and 30 kg) for a total of eight armour × load ensembles. In each ensemble, participants walked for 10 min at 1.53 m s−1 and 1.81 m s−1 speeds. Whole-body marker kinematics and ground reaction forces were used, along with a scaled anatomic model, to determine peak lower-limb joint angles, net joint moments, and negative knee work. Peak parameters were compared between armour types, walking speeds, and carried loads using repeated measures ANOVAs. Results: Peak plantarflexion and hip abduction moments were reduced when wearing cARM1 (p = 0.040, p = 0.045) and cARM2 (p = 0.045, p = 0.003) compared to TBAS, while carrying 30 kg and/or walking fast. This suggests positive benefits of load distribution at higher task demands. Joint moments increased when participants carried greater load and/or walked faster, and the combined effects of carried load and walking speed were mostly additive. Conclusions: Primarily hip-borne load carriage does not negatively alter joint kinetics, and some positive adaptations occurred during tasks with higher demands. These results can inform equipment design and physical training programs for load carriage.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCI LTD
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom158
dc.relation.ispartofpageto163
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE IN SPORT
dc.relation.ispartofvolume22
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical Physiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1106
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1116
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titlePrimarily hip-borne load carriage does not alter biomechanical risk factors for overuse injuries in soldiers
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSaxby, David J.
gro.griffith.authorLloyd, David
gro.griffith.authorDoyle, Tim L.
gro.griffith.authorLenton, Gavin
gro.griffith.authorHiggs, Jeremy P.


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