Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSilk, Aaron
dc.contributor.authorLenton, Gavin
dc.contributor.authorSavage, Robbie
dc.contributor.authorAisbett, Brad
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-12T01:20:10Z
dc.date.available2019-08-12T01:20:10Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn0014-0139
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00140139.2017.1349933
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/383070
dc.description.abstractSearch and rescue operations are necessary in locating, assisting and recovering individuals lost or in distress. In Australia, land-based search and rescue roles require a range of physically demanding tasks undertaken in dynamic and challenging environments. The aim of the current research was to identify and characterise the physically demanding tasks inherent to search and rescue operation personnel within Australia. These aims were met through a subjective job task analysis approach. In total, 11 criterion tasks were identified by personnel. These tasks were the most physically demanding, frequently occurring and operationally important tasks to these specialist roles. Muscular strength was the dominant fitness component for 7 of the 11 tasks. In addition to the discrete criterion tasks, an operational scenario was established. With the tasks and operational scenario identified, objective task analysis procedures can be undertaken so that practitioners can implement evidence-based strategies, such as physical selection procedures and task-based physical training programs, commensurate with the physical demands of search and rescue job roles. Practitioner Summary: The identification of physically demanding tasks amongst specialist emergency service roles predicates health and safety strategies which can be incorporated into organisations. Knowledge of physical task parameters allows employers to mitigate injury risk through the implementation of strategies modelled on the precise physical demands of the role.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom265
dc.relation.ispartofpageto272
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalErgonomics
dc.relation.ispartofvolume61
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchDesign Practice and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1106
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1203
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.titleJob task characteristics of Australian emergency services volunteers during search and rescue operations
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Taylor & Francis. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Ergonomics on 28 Jul 2017, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/00140139.2017.1349933
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorLenton, Gavin


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record