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dc.contributor.authorNg, JYS
dc.contributor.authorHow, E
dc.contributor.authorSchwindack, C
dc.contributor.authorLam, A
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-11T03:11:25Z
dc.date.available2019-06-11T03:11:25Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1757-790X
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bcr-2018-224354
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/383340
dc.description.abstractWe report a case of a 63-year-old woman who was presented to the emergency department with an occipital haemorrhage secondary to a pancreatic cerebral metastasis. Pancreatic cancer is the ninth most common cancer in women in Australia, and distant disease is present in 70% of patients with pancreatic cancer at the time of diagnosis. However, metastases to the brain are rare, accounting for only 0.33%-0.57% cases antemortem. Herein, we discuss the management of this unusual case to highlight the importance of recognising unusual central nervous system involvement of cancers, a problem which may be increasing in prevalence.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMJ Case Reports
dc.relation.ispartofvolume2018
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.titleMetastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma presenting as an occipital haemorrhage
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2018. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. It is posted here with permission of the copyright owner(s) for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this journal please refer to the publisher’s website or contact the author(s).
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorLam, Alfred K.


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