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dc.contributor.authorHanandeh, Alien_US
dc.contributor.authorEl-Zein, Abbasen_US
dc.contributor.editorOscar Montes deen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:38:47Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:38:47Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2013-09-24T22:35:55Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/38338
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.anzsee.org/en_US
dc.description.abstractEnergy from waste has been identified as a source of green energy and an effective method to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE). Nevertheless, energy from waste presents a source of conflict between different levels of government, public and the industry. Opposition may argue that energy from waste plants pose health risk to the public, increase the cost of solid waste management, have negative environmental impacts and encourage NIMBY (not in my backyard) attitude. On the other hand, some social actors may hold opposite views because they perceive them as source of income or as effective methods of maximizing resource utilization from waste. Clearly, selecting an appropriate energy from waste strategy in democratic systems of government involves many layers of decisions and requires the construction of effective dialogue mechanisms among many social agents. This paper demonstrates how life-cycle analysis combined with cost analysis can be integrated with conflict analysis models under conditions of uncertainty to select an appropriate policy for energy from waste production from the combustible fraction of the municipal solid waste of Sydney. The results show that anaerobic digestion combined with recycling is the strategy most likely to achieve highest level of environmental benefits while minimising social conflict.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent137590 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAustralia New Zealand Society for Ecological Economicsen_US
dc.publisher.placeDarwin Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.anzsee.org/2009conference/2009conference_pageholder.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameANZSEE 2009en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleGreen milage in the global meltdown: an ecological economics way forward. Proceedings of the conference of the Australia New Zealand Society for Ecological Economicsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2009-10-27en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2009-10-30en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationDarwin Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcological Applications not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Engineering Modellingen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050199en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode090702en_US
dc.titleEnergy from waste: Incorporating the perspective of multiple agentsen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2009. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference’s website or contact the authors.en_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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