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dc.contributor.authorSteiner, Konstanze
dc.contributor.authorWood, Susanna A
dc.contributor.authorPuddick, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorHawes, Ian
dc.contributor.authorDietrich, Daniel R
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, David P
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-09T01:32:51Z
dc.date.available2019-06-09T01:32:51Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn0948-3055
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/ame01852
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/383430
dc.description.abstractToxic Cyanobacteria-dominated blooms are a global phenomenon that poses a health risk to humans and animals. These blooms harbor a diverse range of heterotrophic bacteria which are involved in growth-promoting and decomposition processes. In the present study, we investigated microbial communities and microcystins in a lake cyanobacterial scum at a single point in time. The outer edges of the scum (ca. 500 cm from shore) were freshly formed, while those closest to the shore showed signs of cyanobacterial cell lysis and degradation. Samples were collected from 5 sites across the scum and from 2 separate bays. We hypothesized that cyanobacterial genera, bacterial communities and microcystin quota (toxin content per cell) would be significantly different in the degrading scums versus where the scum had freshly formed. Samples were analyzed using 16S rRNA metabarcoding (DNA and RNA), and a range of physicochemical parameters were determined. Microcystis transcripts were more abundant than Dolichospermum in the breaking-down scum, suggesting they are better suited to tolerating the harsh physicochemical conditions encountered within scums. Multivariate analysis of operational taxonomic units (excluding Cyanobacteria) showed significant differences in bacterial community structures across the scums. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum, among which Aeromonas, Caulobacter and Brevundimonas dominated. No relationships were observed between microcystin quotas and bacterial community structure or position in the scum.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.sponsorshipIan Potter Foundation
dc.description.sponsorshipGriffith University
dc.description.sponsorshipCawthron Institute Trust Board
dc.description.sponsorshipInstitute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences Limited
dc.description.sponsorshipReef and Rainforest Research Centre
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversities Australia
dc.description.sponsorshipDept of Science, Information Technology, Innovation & the Arts (DSITIA)
dc.description.sponsorshipGriffith University
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherINTER-RESEARCH
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom243
dc.relation.ispartofpageto256
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY
dc.relation.ispartofvolume80
dc.relation.urihttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/ARC/DP190101848
dc.relation.grantIDDP190101848
dc.relation.fundersARC
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMicrobiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0605
dc.titleA comparison of bacterial community structure, activity and microcystins associated with formation and breakdown of a cyanobacterial scum
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Inter Research. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHamilton, David P.


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