Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBennett, Andy
dc.contributor.authorStrong, Catherine
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-13T00:20:56Z
dc.date.available2019-08-13T00:20:56Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1749-9755
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1749975518762569
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/383938
dc.description.abstractAlthough the study of popular music heritage is rapidly becoming an established aspect of academic research, little attention has been focused on attempts made by groups of music fans to preserve aspects of their local popular music heritage when these are seen to come under threat. This article examines the ‘Save the Palace’ campaign in Melbourne, Australia, and argues that it provides an important illustration of the tenacity of local music fans when faced with the closure of an important venue, and their capacity to organise themselves into a cohesive campaign through social media technology. Through its examination of the online interactions that characterised the Save the Palace campaign, the article also facilitates an extension of the concept of the virtual scene beyond its more conventionally understood definition as a platform for fan discussion dedicated to a specific artist, genre or place. In the case of Save the Palace, a different manifestation of a scene is observed whereby fans of a broad range of artists and genres temporarily join forces online to protest against the threat to a specific aspect of their shared local music heritage. In this sense, Save the Palace also sheds significant light on how social media assist in giving a voice to competing discourses of cultural value. Thus, even as the Palace and countless other local music landmarks like it across the world are demolished to make way for new developments, their significance as important markers of local generational identity and belonging, and of emotionally inscribed urban identity, remains. Through their online sharing of personalised memories of the Palace as an iconic music venue, supporters of the Save the Palace campaign serve as a further example of how the internet has worked to broaden our understanding of the definition, nature and function of popular music heritage.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSage
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom368
dc.relation.ispartofpageto383
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCultural Sociology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume12
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCultural Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1608
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2002
dc.titlePopular Music Heritage, Grass-Roots Activism and Web 2.0: The Case of the "Save the Palace' Campaign
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBennett, Andy A.


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record