Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorO'Neil, Andrew
dc.contributor.editorRozman, Gilbert
dc.contributor.editorLiow, Joseph Chinyong
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-10T01:33:09Z
dc.date.available2019-06-10T01:33:09Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.isbn9789811031717
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-981-10-3171-7_17
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/384102
dc.description.abstractWhile attention has been devoted to the consequences of the US rebalance to Asia, Australia has sought to define its own regional pivot. Along with Japan, China and Indonesia are the most important countries in Asia for economic ties and security considerations. The embassy in Jakarta has become the single biggest overseas post. Australia needs to guard against a tendency to exaggerate its influence in regional capitals, something the Rudd government found out the hard way when its Asia-Pacific Security Cooperation initiative imploded. Maintaining productive relations with Jakarta is arguably the toughest foreign policy challenge. No other bilateral relationship is subject to as many roundabouts. “More Jakarta” is no doubt a good thing if the quality of engagement is at least as positive as the quantity.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.publisher.placeSingapore
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleInternational Relations and Asia’s Southern Tier ASEAN, Australia, and India
dc.relation.ispartofchapter17
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom261
dc.relation.ispartofpageto275
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolitical Science
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1606
dc.titleLess Geneva, More Jakarta: Assessing Australia’s Asia Pivot
dc.typeBook chapter
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Chapters
dc.type.codeB - Book Chapters
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorO'Neil, Andrew K.


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Book chapters
    Contains book chapters authored by Griffith authors.

Show simple item record