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dc.contributor.authorChan, Derwin King Chung
dc.contributor.authorKeatley, David A
dc.contributor.authorTang, Tracy CW
dc.contributor.authorDimmock, James A
dc.contributor.authorHagger, Martin S
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-09T01:34:00Z
dc.date.available2019-06-09T01:34:00Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1440-2440
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jsams.2017.05.020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/384377
dc.description.abstractObjectives: This preliminary study examined whether implicit doping attitude, explicit doping attitude, or both, predicted athletes’ vigilance towards unintentional doping. Design: A cross-sectional correlational design. Methods: Australian athletes (N = 143; Mage = 18.13, SD = 4.63) completed measures of implicit doping attitude (brief single-category implicit association test), explicit doping attitude (Performance Enhancement Attitude Scale), avoidance of unintentional doping (Self-Reported Treatment Adherence Scale), and behavioural vigilance task of unintentional doping (reading the ingredients of an unfamiliar food product). Results: Positive implicit doping attitude and explicit doping attitude were negatively related to athletes’ likelihood of reading the ingredients table of an unfamiliar food product, and positively related to athletes’ vigilance towards unintentional doping. Neither attitude measures predicted avoidance of unintentional doping. Overall, the magnitude of associations by implicit doping attitude appeared to be stronger than that of explicit doping attitude. Conclusions: Athletes with positive implicit and explicit doping attitudes were less likely to read the ingredients table of an unknown food product, but were more likely to be aware of the possible presence of banned substances in a certain food product. Implicit doping attitude appeared to explain athletes’ behavioural response to the avoidance of unintentional doping beyond variance explained by explicit doping attitude.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCI LTD
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom238
dc.relation.ispartofpageto244
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE IN SPORT
dc.relation.ispartofvolume21
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1106
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleImplicit versus explicit attitude to doping: Which better predicts athletes' vigilance towards unintentional doping?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionPre-print
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHagger, Martin S.


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