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dc.contributor.authorKitunen, Anna
dc.contributor.authorRundle-Thiele, Sharyn
dc.contributor.authorKadir, Mohammad
dc.contributor.authorBadejo, Abi
dc.contributor.authorZdanowicz, George
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Megan
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-14T01:31:53Z
dc.date.available2019-06-14T01:31:53Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12889-019-6696-2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/384483
dc.description.abstractBackground While acknowledged as one of social marketing’s necessities, limited reporting of segmentation exists. The current study seeks to extend segmentation drawing on all four segmentation bases within the context of Queensland young adult sexual health behaviour. Methods An online survey was used to collect data from 15 to 29 year old people in Queensland, Australia. Data collection was undertaken online to capture the broader population of young adults and in person on campuses to gather data from students who were currently enrolled at University. Quotas were set to ensure a broad representation was attained reflecting the States demography. Results Two-step cluster analysis revealed three different segments. The most important variables in segment formation were age, household type, experience of risky sexual encounters and previously being tested or treated for sexually transmissible infections (STIs). The results suggest that demographic and behavioural variables were the most effective in segment definition. Conclusions This study investigated young people aged 15–29 in Queensland, Australia to examine group differences drawing from four bases. This study revealed three distinct segments in a sexual health context and highlighted the importance of behavioural variables in segment formation, insight and understanding.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBMC
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto10
dc.relation.ispartofissue382
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMC PUBLIC HEALTH
dc.relation.ispartofvolume19
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth services and systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic health
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4203
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4206
dc.titleLearning what our target audiences think and do: extending segmentation to all four bases
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s). 2019 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorKitunen, Anna Katariina K.
gro.griffith.authorRundle-Thiele, Sharyn
gro.griffith.authorKadir, Mohammad A.
gro.griffith.authorBadejo, Abi A.


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