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dc.contributor.authorKurek, Anna
dc.contributor.authorJose, Paul E
dc.contributor.authorStuart, Jaimee
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-31T03:21:18Z
dc.date.available2019-07-31T03:21:18Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0747-5632
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chb.2019.03.027
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/384526
dc.description.abstractA large proportion of youth believe that the world of cyberspace provides them with a relatively safe and anonymous digital bubble ripe for uninhibited self-expression. At the same time, observers have noted an increase of individuals behaving in an unrestrained manner on the Internet, while researchers have reported elevated rates of cyber aggressive behavior. What remains unclear, however, is whether, and how, disinhibition might be related to cyber aggression. In an aim to explore the possible associations, a large sample (total N = 709) of high school (M age = 15.56 years) respondents from New Zealand were recruited, and completed a survey featuring scales assessing personality and technology behaviors, attitudes, habits, and trends. The present study was designed to investigate whether the three dark personality traits of narcissism, psychopathy, and sadism would predict false self perceptions, and in sequence, online disinhibition and aggressive online behavior. All three dark personality traits, as well as false self, were positively associated with online disinhibition. Perceptions of false self were found to be a significant predictor of cyber aggression when mediated by online disinhibition. In the case of cyber aggression, however, psychopathy, sadistic traits, and online disinhibition were found to be significant predictors of this outcome. The results collectively provide a more nuanced understanding of how antisocial personality traits are associated with maladaptive identity formation (i.e., endorsement of false self beliefs) as well as maladaptive online behavior.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom31
dc.relation.ispartofpageto40
dc.relation.ispartofjournalComputers in Human Behavior
dc.relation.ispartofvolume98
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive and computational psychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode52
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode5204
dc.title'I did it for the LULZ': How the dark personality predicts online disinhibition and aggressive online behavior in adolescence
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionpost-print
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorStuart, Jaimee


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