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dc.contributor.authorZhang, Chun-Qing
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Ru
dc.contributor.authorSchwarzer, Ralf
dc.contributor.authorHagger, Martin S
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-01T01:03:41Z
dc.date.available2020-09-01T01:03:41Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0278-6133en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/hea0000728en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/384531
dc.description.abstractObjective: The health action process approach (HAPA) is a social- cognitive model specifying motivational and volitional determinants of health behavior. A meta-analysis of studies applying the HAPA in health behavior contexts was conducted to estimate the size and variability of correlations among model constructs, test model predictions, and test effects of past behavior and moderators (behavior type, sample type, measurement lag, study quality) on model relations. Method: A literature search identified 95 studies meeting inclusion criteria with 108 independent samples. Averaged corrected correlations among HAPA constructs and multivariate tests of model predictions were computed using conventional meta-analysis and meta-analytic structural equation modeling, with separate models estimated in each moderator group. Results: Action and maintenance self-efficacy and outcome expectancies had smallto- medium sized effects on health behavior, with effects of outcome expectancies and action self-efficacy mediated by intentions, and action and coping planning. Effects of risk perceptions and recovery self-efficacy were small by comparison. Past behavior attenuated the intention-behavior relationship. Few variations in model effects were observed across moderator groups. Effects of action self-efficacy on intentions and behavior were larger in studies on physical activity compared with studies on dietary behaviors, whereas effects of volitional self-efficacy on behavior were larger in studies on dietary behaviors. Conclusions: Findings highlight the importance of self-efficacy in predicting health behavior in motivational and volitional action phases. The analysis is expected to catalyze future research including experimental studies targeting change in individual HAPA constructs, and longitudinal research to examine change and reciprocal effects among constructs in the model.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom623en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto637en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue7en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalHealth Psychologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume38en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducationen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode13en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17en_US
dc.titleA Meta-Analysis of the Health Action Process Approachen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dc.description.versionPost-printen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 American Psycological Association. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record. Reproduced here in accordance with publisher policy. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
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gro.griffith.authorHagger, Martin S.


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