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dc.contributor.authorLee, Boon L
dc.contributor.authorWorthington, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Clevo
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-01T03:53:15Z
dc.date.available2019-08-01T03:53:15Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0951-354X
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/IJEM-05-2017-0103
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/384541
dc.description.abstractPurpose Existing studies of school efficiency primarily specify teacher inputs as the number of teachers and perhaps the student-teacher ratio. As a result, there is no direct qualitative recognition of the learning environment. The purpose of this paper is to incorporate the learning environment directly into the assessment of school efficiency. Design/methodology/approach The authors employ data envelopment analysis to derive efficiency scores and the double-bootstrap truncated regression approach in Simar and Wilson’s (2007) Journal of Econometrics to quantify the sources of efficiency in 430 Queensland state primary schools. In the first stage, the outputs of student National Assessment Program-Literacy and Numeracy scores and the inputs of full-time equivalent teaching staff and cumulative capital expenditure per student are used to measure efficiency. In the second stage, the authors specify an index of community socio-educational advantage, class size, the share of teachers with postgraduate qualifications, funds spent on professional development, and surveyed opinions from parents/caregivers, students, staff and principals on the learning environment to explain these measures of efficiency. Findings Socio-economic background and the teaching environment affect school efficiency. Although not all variables related to teacher contribution are significant, there is evidence to suggest that teachers have a positive influence on student performance hence school efficiency. Teachers ability to clearly explain the requirements of schoolwork tasks and listening to student opinions sets an ideal student engagement environment which can have a profound impact on student learning. Practical implications From a policy perspective, policy makers should target resources at inefficient schools aimed at enhancing student learning through teacher development and, at the same time, providing financial and non-financial educational assistance to students and their families from a low socio-educational background. Originality/value This is the first large-scale primary school efficiency analysis to incorporate the Simar and Wilson (2007) approach to explaining the determinants of efficiency, including teaching environment from the perspective of students, teachers and other stakeholders.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherEMERALD GROUP PUBLISHING LTD
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom678
dc.relation.ispartofpageto697
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL MANAGEMENT
dc.relation.ispartofvolume33
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCommerce, Management, Tourism and Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode13
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode15
dc.titleLearning environment and primary school efficiency A DEA bootstrap truncated regression analysis
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Emerald. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWorthington, Andrew C.


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