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dc.contributor.authorNeale, Peta A
dc.contributor.authorLeusch, Frederic DL
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-11T03:02:15Z
dc.date.available2019-07-11T03:02:15Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0944-1344
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11356-019-05017-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/384546
dc.description.abstractConcerns regarding disinfection by-product (DBP) formation during drinking water treatment have led water utilities to apply treatment processes to reduce the concentration of DBP precursor natural organic matter (NOM). However, these processes often do not remove bromide, leading to high bromide to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) ratios after treatment, which can increase the formation of more toxic brominated DBPs. In the current study, we investigated the formation and effect of DBPs in a matrix of synthetic water samples containing different concentrations of bromide and DOC after disinfection with chlorine. Trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids were analysed by chemical analysis, while effect was evaluated using in vitro bioassays indicative of the oxidative stress response and bacterial toxicity. While the addition of increasing bromide concentrations did not alter the sum molar concentration of DBPs formed, the speciation changed, with greater bromine incorporation with an increasing Br:DOC ratio. However, the observed effect did not correlate with the Br:DOC ratio, but instead, effect increased with increasing DOC concentration. Water samples with low DOC and high bromide did not exceed the available oxidative stress response effect-based trigger value (EBT), while all samples with high DOC, irrespective of the bromide concentration, exceeded the EBT. This suggests that treatment processes that remove NOM can improve drinking water quality, even if they are unable to remove bromide. Further, iceberg modelling showed that detected DBPs only explained a small fraction of the oxidative stress response, supporting the application of both chemical analysis and bioanalysis for monitoring DBP formation.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSPRINGER HEIDELBERG
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom17100
dc.relation.ispartofpageto17109
dc.relation.ispartofissue17
dc.relation.ispartofjournalENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH
dc.relation.ispartofvolume26
dc.subject.fieldofresearchChemical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode03
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode05
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.titleAssessing the role of different dissolved organic carbon and bromide concentrations for disinfection by-product formation using chemical analysis and bioanalysis
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorNeale, Peta A.
gro.griffith.authorLeusch, Frederic


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