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dc.contributor.authorNielsen, Jane
dc.contributor.authorBubela, Tania
dc.contributor.authorChalmers, Don RC
dc.contributor.authorJohns, Amber
dc.contributor.authorKahl, Linda
dc.contributor.authorKamens, Joanne
dc.contributor.authorLawson, Charles
dc.contributor.authorLiddicoat, John
dc.contributor.authorMcWhirter, Rebekah
dc.contributor.authorMonotti, Ann
dc.contributor.authorScheibner, James
dc.contributor.authorWhitton, Tess
dc.contributor.authorNicol, Dianne
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-09T01:36:29Z
dc.date.available2019-06-09T01:36:29Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1545-7885
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pbio.2006031
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/384713
dc.description.abstractWhereas biological materials were once transferred freely, there has been a marked shift in the formalisation of exchanges involving these materials, primarily through the use of Material Transfer Agreements (MTAs). This paper considers how risk aversion dominates MTA negotiations and the impact it may have on scientific progress. Risk aversion is often based on unwarranted fears of incurring liability through the use of a material or loss of control or missing out on commercialisation opportunities. Evidence to date has suggested that complexity tends to permeate even straightforward transactions despite extensive efforts to implement simple, standard MTAs. We argue that in most cases, MTAs need do little more than establish provenance, and any attempt to extend MTAs beyond this simple function constitutes stifling behaviour. Drawing on available examples of favourable practice, we point to a number of strategies that may usefully be employed to reduce risk-averse tendencies, including the promotion of simplicity, education of those engaged in the MTA process, and achieving a cultural shift in the way in which technology transfer office (TTO) success is measured in institutions employing MTAs.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.relation.ispartofissue8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPLOS BIOLOGY
dc.relation.ispartofvolume16
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAgricultural, veterinary and food sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiomedical and clinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode31
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode30
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode32
dc.titleProvenance and risk in transfer of biological materials
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Nielsen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorLawson, Charles


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