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dc.contributor.authorLee, Mindy
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Karen
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Glenda
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-04T12:41:36Z
dc.date.available2019-07-04T12:41:36Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0033-2941
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0033294118770357
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/384868
dc.description.abstractPositive face-to-face human interactions are known to benefit well-being. Drawing upon previous work regarding the interference of media (via technological devices or print) in social interaction, the aim of this study was to identify whether using media during face-to-face interaction could potentially limit the positive effect of interaction on well-being. Participants were 437 university students who completed an online survey which assessed media multitasking behaviors, well-being (trait depression, trait anxiety, social anxiety, empathy, and psychological well-being), and personality traits (Big-5 and narcissism). Face-to-face interaction was positively associated with well-being. However, when media use during face-to-face interaction was considered, there was a negative relationship with well-being (more depression, more anxiety, and less psychological well-being). Those who used certain media types, such as phone or video chatting, listening to music, and gaming, while interacting with others, also had lower scores on measures of empathy. Regression analyses showed significant contributions by these media types to empathy levels, even after controlling for age, gender, and personality traits. Face-to-face media multitasking was related to higher levels of narcissism and neuroticism, and lower levels of agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness. This study provides insight into the possible role of media multitasking during face-to-face interaction on psychosocial outcomes.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSage Publication Ltd
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto24
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychological Reports
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.titleUsing Media While Interacting Face-to-Face Is Associated With Psychosocial Well-Being and Personality Traits
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMurphy, Karen A.
gro.griffith.authorAndrews, Glenda
gro.griffith.authorLee, Mindy W.


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