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dc.contributor.authorWooditch, Alese
dc.contributor.authorMbaba, Mary
dc.contributor.authorKiss, Marissa
dc.contributor.authorLawson, William
dc.contributor.authorTaxman, Faye
dc.contributor.authorAltice, Frederick L
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-10T01:33:07Z
dc.date.available2019-06-10T01:33:07Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1099-3460
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11524-017-0156-z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/385065
dc.description.abstractResidential mobility and type of housing contributes to an individual’s likelihood and frequency of drug/alcohol use and committing criminal offenses. Little research has focused simultaneously on the influence of housing status on the use of drugs and criminal behavior. The present study examines how residential mobility (transitions in housing) and recent housing stability (prior 30 days) correlates with self-reported criminal activity and drug/alcohol use among a sample of 504 addicted, treatment-seeking opioid users with a history of criminal justice involvement. Findings suggest that those with a greater number of housing transitions were considerably less likely to self-report criminal activity, and criminal involvement was highest among those who were chronically homeless. Residential mobility was unassociated with days of drug and alcohol use; however, residing in regulated housing (halfway houses and homeless shelters) was associated with a decreased frequency of substance use. The finding that residing at sober-living housing facilities with regulations governing behavior (regulated housing) was associated with a lower likelihood of illicit substance use may suggest that regulated housing settings may influence behavior. Further research in this area should explore how social networks and other related variables moderate the effects of housing type and mobility on crime and substance use.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSPRINGER
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom61
dc.relation.ispartofpageto70
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJOURNAL OF URBAN HEALTH-BULLETIN OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE
dc.relation.ispartofvolume95
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1106
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleHousing Experiences among Opioid-Dependent, Criminal Justice-Involved Individuals in Washington, DC
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Springer Netherlands. This is an electronic version of an article published in Angiogenesis, February 2018, Volume 95, Issue 1, pp 61–70. Angiogenesis is available online at: http://link.springer.com/ with the open URL of your article.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorTaxman, Faye


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