Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGuillon, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClément, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSébille, V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRivain, J-G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChou, C-F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLe Pendu, J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:09:58Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:09:58Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2011-05-03T04:47:01Z
dc.identifier.issn09596658en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/glycob/cwn093en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/38532
dc.description.abstractSevere acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is a highly pathogenic emergent virus which replicates in cells that can express ABH histo-blood group antigens. The heavily glycosylated SARS-CoV spike (S) protein binds to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 which serves as a cellular receptor. Epidemiological analysis of a hospital outbreak in Hong Kong revealed that blood group O was associated with a low risk of infection. In this study, we used a cellular model of adhesion to investigate whether natural antibodies of the ABO system could block the S protein and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 interaction. To this aim, a C-terminally EGFP-tagged S protein was expressed in chinese hamster ovary cells cotransfected with an alpha1,2-fucosyltransferase and an A-transferase in order to coexpress the S glycoprotein ectodomain and the A antigen at the cell surface. We observed that the S protein/angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-dependent adhesion of these cells to an angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 expressing cell line was specifically inhibited by either a monoclonal or human natural anti-A antibodies, indicating that these antibodies may block the interaction between the virus and its receptor, thereby providing protection. In order to more fully appreciate the potential effect of the ABO polymorphism on the epidemiology of SARS, we built a mathematical model of the virus transmission dynamics that takes into account the protective effect of ABO natural antibodies. The model indicated that the ABO polymorphism could contribute to substantially reduce the virus transmission, affecting both the number of infected individuals and the kinetics of the epidemic.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeOxford, UKen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationYen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1085en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1093en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue12en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGlycobiologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume18en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchVirologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060506en_US
dc.titleInhibition of the interaction between the SARS-CoV spike protein and its cellular receptor by anti-histo-blood group antibodiesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record