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dc.contributor.authorGnanamanickam, Emmanuel S
dc.contributor.authorDyer, Suzanne M
dc.contributor.authorMilte, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Stephanie L
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Enwu
dc.contributor.authorEaston, Tiffany
dc.contributor.authorBradley, Clare
dc.contributor.authorBilton, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorShulver, Wendy
dc.contributor.authorRatcliffe, Julie
dc.contributor.authorWhitehead, Craig
dc.contributor.authorCrotty, Maria
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-20T23:21:56Z
dc.date.available2019-06-20T23:21:56Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn0885-6230
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/gps.4842
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/385701
dc.description.abstractObjectives: This analysis estimates the whole‐of‐system direct costs for people living with dementia in residential care by using a broad health and social care provision perspective and compares it to people without dementia living in residential care. Methods: Data were collected from 541 individuals living permanently in 17 care facilities across Australia. The annual cost of health and residential care was determined by using individual resource use data and reported by the dementia status of the individuals. Results: The average annual whole‐of‐system cost for people living with dementia in residential care was approximately AU$88 000 (US$ 67 100) per person in 2016. The cost of residential care constituted 93% of the total costs. The direct health care costs were comprised mainly of hospital admissions (48%), pharmaceuticals (31%) and out‐of‐hospital attendances (15%). While total costs were not significantly different between those with and without dementia, the cost of residential care was significantly higher and the cost of health care was significantly lower for people living with dementia. Conclusion: This study provides the first estimate of the whole‐of‐system costs of providing health and residential care for people living with dementia in residential aged care in Australia using individual level health and social care data. This predominantly bottom‐up cost estimate indicates the high cost associated with caring for people with dementia living permanently in residential care, which is underestimated when limited cost perspectives or top‐down, population costing approaches are taken.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom859
dc.relation.ispartofpageto866
dc.relation.ispartofissue7
dc.relation.ispartofjournalINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY
dc.relation.ispartofvolume33
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.titleDirect health and residential care costs of people living with dementia in Australian residential aged care
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyrightThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. © 2018 The Authors. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorEaston, Tiffany


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