Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCowie, Eloise
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Kyra
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-21T04:20:00Z
dc.date.available2019-06-21T04:20:00Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1359-107X
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/bjhp.12316
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/385718
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Despite the unequivocal benefits of regular physical activity, many parents engage in lower levels of physical activity (PA) following the birth of a child. Drawing on the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and health action process approach (HAPA), an integrative model was developed to examine variables predicting PA in parents of very young children. In addition, key beliefs related to PA intentions and behaviour among parents of very young children were investigated. Design: A prospective‐correlational design with two waves of data collection, spaced one week apart, was adopted. Methods: Parents (N = 297) completed an online‐ or paper‐based questionnaire assessing TPB global constructs and belief‐based items as well as family social support and planning from the HAPA. One week later, parents self‐reported their PA behaviour. Data were analysed using latent variable structural equation modelling. Results: Findings revealed the model was a good fit to the data, accounting for 62% and 27% of the variance in PA intentions and behaviour, respectively. Attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioural control predicted intentions. Family social support failed to predict both planning and intentions. Physical activity was predicted by planning only, with an indirect effect occurring from intentions to behaviour through planning. A number of key beliefs on intentions and behaviour were also identified. Conclusions: This formative research provides further understanding of the factors that influence the PA behaviour of parents of very young children. Results provide targets for future interventions to increase PA for parents in a transition phase where PA levels decline.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom782
dc.relation.ispartofpageto803
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBRITISH JOURNAL OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
dc.relation.ispartofvolume23
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth services and systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic health
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4203
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4206
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4410
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode52
dc.titlePhysical activity and parents of very young children: The role of beliefs and social-cognitive factors
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 British Psychological Society. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Physical activity and parents of very young children: The role of beliefs and social‐cognitive factors, British Journal of Health Psychology, Volume 23, Issue 4, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/bjhp.12316. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHamilton, Kyra
gro.griffith.authorCowie, Eloise


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record