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dc.contributor.authorElder, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Amy NB
dc.contributor.authorWallis, Marianne
dc.contributor.authorGreenslade, Jaimi H
dc.contributor.authorCrilly, Julia
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-01T04:30:33Z
dc.date.available2019-07-01T04:30:33Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1755-599X
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ienj.2019.03.006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/385965
dc.description.abstractBackground: Research exploring multi-disciplinary emergency department (ED) clinicians’ perceptions of their working environment is limited, although exposure to occupational stressors is frequent. This study describes ED clinicians’ perceptions of their working environment, occupational stressors and their use of coping strategies. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in 2017 at two Australian public hospital EDs. Nursing and medical staff completed a print-based survey of 100 items, which included three scales and a demographic questionnaire. Responses were analysed using descriptive statistics and regression analysis. Results: Doctors and nurses (n = 241) completed the survey (response rate 45%). Workload featured as a major factor in perception of the working environment and was a frequently occurring stressor. Death or sexual abuse of a child was the highest rated stressor, despite relative infrequency of exposure. When coping strategies were adjusted for sex, female respondents were more likely to use negative strategies such as blaming themselves (Odds Ratio, OR 4 [1.6–9.7]; p < 0.01) and less likely to use positive strategies such as exercise (OR 0.2 [0.1–0.6]; p < 0.01). Conclusions: While stressors were similarly rated among the diverse group of clinicians, the ways in which they reported coping varied. Further research is required to facilitate design of staff support strategies.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherELSEVIER
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Emergency Nursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110
dc.titleEmergency clinician perceptions of occupational stressors and coping strategies: A multi-site study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorJohnston, Amy N.
gro.griffith.authorElder, Elizabeth G.
gro.griffith.authorWallis, Marianne
gro.griffith.authorCrilly, Julia


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