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dc.contributor.authorBarnes, Katelyn
dc.contributor.authorBeach, Bettina
dc.contributor.authorBall, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorDesbrow, Ben
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-10T04:15:54Z
dc.date.available2019-07-10T04:15:54Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1446-6368
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1747-0080.12545
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/385993
dc.description.abstractAim: To describe client expectations and the experience of nutrition care provided by personal trainers and explore factors that influence expectations of nutrition care. Methods: A cross-sectional survey identified expectations of nutrition care provided by personal trainers. Likert scales explored expected nutrition care, nutrition knowledge of personal trainers and experiences of those who had received nutrition care from a personal trainer. Expectations were evaluated using descriptive statistics. Associations between expectations and participant characteristics were explored with Pearson chi-squared tests. Results: Six hundred twenty-seven Australian residents participated (77% female; 16–74 years of age). Participants frequently expected personal trainers to be knowledgeable about and discuss general healthy eating, muscle gain and weight loss. Half of the participants expected personal trainers to discuss and be knowledgeable about nutrition for chronic disease. Of the 334 participants who had engaged a personal trainer, 98% received nutrition care. Half of these participants (n = 167) were satisfied with the nutrition care they received, and 40% reported positive dietary changes because of their personal trainers’ nutrition care. Tertiary education and perceived healthfulness of diet lowered expectations of nutrition care from personal trainers (P < 0.001). Engagement of a personal trainer did not influence expectations of nutrition discussions (P > 0.01) but increased expectations of personal trainer nutrition knowledge (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Clients expect personal trainers to provide nutrition care. Client expectations may compel personal trainers to provide nutrition care beyond the recommended scope of practice. Strategies to manage client expectations, including awareness of the personal trainer scope of practice, are needed to ensure safe and effective nutrition care from personal trainers.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.relation.ispartofjournalNutrition and Dietetics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNutrition and Dietetics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchFood Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1111
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0908
dc.titleClients expect nutrition care to be provided by personal trainers in Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Dietitians Association of Australia. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Clients expect nutrition care to be provided by personal trainers in Australia, Nutrition & Dietetics, AOV, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/1747-0080.12545. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDesbrow, Ben
gro.griffith.authorBarnes, Katelyn A.
gro.griffith.authorBall, Lauren E.
gro.griffith.authorBeach, Bettina


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