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dc.contributor.authorUsher, Wayne
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-13T04:44:48Z
dc.date.available2019-08-13T04:44:48Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0017-8969en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0017896919867438en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/386577
dc.description.abstractObjective: This study sought to investigate the relationship between personal, university, home and community influences on Australia’s university students’ mental health status. Design: Positioned within a qualitative, interpretivist paradigm, the study collected data from participants (n = 934) by means of an online survey requesting lived or witnessed experiences concerning mental health concerns. Bronfenbrenner’s socio-ecological model informed the design of the study. Setting: Five major Australian higher educational settings. Method: Leximancer software was used for concept development. Data were analysed using thematic coding. Results: Findings provide qualitative data of university students’ experiences concerning mental health status, as measured across four domains. Themes identified include personal (stress, anxiety, life skills), university (grades/free physical activity) and home (closer to home, support networks) dimensions. There was no unprompted reference to the community domain. Results reinforce the need to ensure that current and future student mental health policies and initiatives are implemented within each of the domains addressed – to ensure a more holistic approach to students’ well-being and care. Conclusion: Findings highlight challenges concerning Australia’s university students’ mental health status. Findings present an opportunity for the university sector, community health services, and sports and fitness organisations to develop and implement future collaborative health promotion in higher education settingsen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom001789691986743en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto001789691986743en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalHealth Education Journalen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Servicesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCurriculum and Pedagogyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1302en_US
dc.titleLiving in quiet desperation: The mental health epidemic in Australia’s higher educationen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationUsher, W, Living in quiet desperation: The mental health epidemic in Australia’s higher education, Health Education Journal, pp. 001789691986743-001789691986743en_US
dc.date.updated2019-08-13T04:09:02Z
dc.description.versionPost-printen_US
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.en_US
gro.rights.copyrightWayne Usher, Living in quiet desperation: The mental health epidemic in Australia’s higher education, Health Education Journal, OnlineFirst. Copyright 2019 The Authors. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorUsher, Wayne T.


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