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dc.contributor.authorPeres, MA
dc.contributor.authorJu, X
dc.contributor.authorMittinty, M
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, AJ
dc.contributor.authorDo, LG
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-19T23:58:56Z
dc.date.available2019-08-19T23:58:56Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0022034519866628
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/386642
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this article was to quantify socioeconomic inequalities in dental caries experience among Australian children and to identify factors that explain area-level socioeconomic inequalities in children’s dental caries. We used data from the National Child Oral Health Survey conducted in Australia between 2012 and 2014 (n = 24,664). Absolute and relative indices of socioeconomic inequalities in the dental caries experience in primary and permanent dentition (decayed, missing, and filled surfaces [dmfs] and DMFS, respectively) were estimated. In the first stage, we conducted multilevel negative binomial regressions to test the association between area-level Index of Relative Socioeconomic Advantage and Disadvantage (IRSAD) and dental caries experience (dmfs for 5- to 8-y-olds and DMFS for 9- to 14-y-olds) after adjustment for water fluoridation status, sociodemographics, oral health behaviors, pattern of dental visits, and sugar consumption. In the second stage, we performed Blinder-Oaxaca and Neumark decomposition analyses to identify factors that explain most of the area-level socioeconomic inequalities in dental caries. Children had a mean dmfs of 3.14 and a mean DMFS of 0.98 surfaces. Children living in the most disadvantaged and intermediately disadvantaged areas had 1.96 (95% confidence interval, 1.69–2.27) and 1.45 (1.26–1.68) times higher mean dmfs and 1.53 (1.36–1.72) and 1.43 (1.27–1.60) times higher mean DMFS than those living in the most advantaged areas, respectively. Water fluoridation status (33.6%), sugar consumption (22.1%), parental educational level (14.2%), and dental visit patterns (12.7%) were the main factors explaining area-level socioeconomic inequalities in dental caries in permanent dentition. Among all the factors considered, the factors that contributed most in explaining inequalities in primary dental caries were dental visits (30.3%), sugar consumption (20.7%), household income (20.0%), and water fluoridation status (15.9%). The inverse area-level socioeconomic inequality in dental caries was mainly explained by modifiable risk factors, such as lack of fluoridated water, high sugar consumption, and an unfavorable pattern of dental visits.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSage
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Dental Research
dc.subject.fieldofresearchDentistry
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1105
dc.subject.keywordsdental public health
dc.subject.keywordsepidemiology
dc.subject.keywordsmathematical modelling
dc.subject.keywordsoral health
dc.subject.keywordssocioeonomic factors
dc.titleModifiable Factors Explain Socioeconomic Inequalities in Children's Dental Caries.
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationPeres, MA; Ju, X; Mittinty, M; Spencer, AJ; Do, LG, Modifiable Factors Explain Socioeconomic Inequalities in Children's Dental Caries., Journal of Dental Research, 2019, pp. 1-8
dc.date.updated2019-08-19T23:12:31Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyrightPeres, M. A.; Ju, X.; Mittinty, M.; Spencer, A. J.; Do, L. G., Modifiable Factors Explain Socioeconomic Inequalities in Children's Dental Caries, Journal of Dental Research. Copyright 2019 The Authors. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDe Anselmo Peres, Marco


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