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dc.contributor.authorWoolfe, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorPrime, David
dc.contributor.authorTjoa, Linda
dc.contributor.authorO'Keefe, Steven
dc.contributor.authorRowlands, David
dc.contributor.authorDionisio, Sasha
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-27T01:09:59Z
dc.date.available2019-08-27T01:09:59Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1388-2457
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.clinph.2019.05.033
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/386710
dc.description.abstractParoxysmal nocturnal movements in epilepsy are a recognised phenomenon, however, the mechanisms that produce them and the effect of the underlying epilepsy still remains elusive. In this study, 10 patients were studied to define the cerebral networks corresponding to these movements and explore how epileptiform activity modulated them. Methods: We compared the change in power of the 25–250 Hz frequency band using event-related synchronization of all stereo-EEG electrodes implanted, during a baseline segment, during nocturnal movements and seizures. Results: The underlying network activated during these paroxysmal movements comprised the insula, anterior cingulate, premotor areas and orbitofrontal regions. Three groups emerged, (1) complete overlap, (2) no overlap and (3) partial overlap of ERS changes of the epileptogenic zone within the proposed network and correlation of semiology between nocturnal movements and seizures. Conclusion: We conclude that nocturnal movements are due to a complex interplay within this physiological network of defined anatomical regions. Epileptic activity had significant impact on nocturnal movements but was not required for generation. Significance: Where the semiology of the first clinical sign of a seizure consistently matches a patient's nocturnal movements, we suggest that the underlying epileptogenic zone is potentially located within this defined network.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1531
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1538
dc.relation.ispartofissue9
dc.relation.ispartofjournalClinical Neurophysiology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume130
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEngineering
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode09
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.titleNocturnal motor events in epilepsy: Is there a defined physiological network?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationWoolfe, M; Prime, D; Tjoa, L; O'Keefe, S; Rowlands, D; Dionisio, S, Nocturnal motor events in epilepsy: Is there a defined physiological network?, Clinical Neurophysiology, 2019, 130 (9), pp. 1531-1538
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2019-08-27T01:07:23Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
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gro.griffith.authorO'Keefe, Steven G.
gro.griffith.authorRowlands, David D.
gro.griffith.authorPrime, Dave L.
gro.griffith.authorWoolfe, Matthew R.
gro.griffith.authorDionisio, Sasha


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