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dc.contributor.authorDissanayaka, Nadeeka NW
dc.contributor.authorAu, Tiffany R
dc.contributor.authorAngwin, Anthony J
dc.contributor.authorIyer, Kartik K
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, John D
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Gerard J
dc.contributor.authorSilburn, Peter A
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, Rodney
dc.contributor.authorMellick, George D
dc.contributor.authorCopland, David A
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-17T00:31:00Z
dc.date.available2019-09-17T00:31:00Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0165-0327
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jad.2018.11.094
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387002
dc.description.abstractBackground: Depression is a predominant non-motor symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD), which is often under recognised and undertreated. To improve identification of depression in PD it is imperative to examine objective brain-related markers. The present study addresses this gap by using electroencephalography (EEG) to evaluate the processing of emotionally valanced words in PD. Methods: Fifty non-demented PD patients, unmedicated for depression or anxiety, completed an affective priming task while EEG was simultaneously recorded. Prime and target word pairs of negative or neutral valence were presented at a short 250 ms stimulus onset asynchrony. Participants were asked to evaluate the valence of the target word by button press. Depression was measured using an established rating scale. Repeated measures analysis of covariance and correlational analyses were performed to examine whether event-related potentials (ERP) varied as a function of depression scores. Results: Key ERP findings reveal reduced responses in parietal midline P300, N400 and Late Positive Potential (LPP) difference waves between congruent and incongruent neutral targets in patients with higher depression scores. Limitations: Comparisons of ERPs were limited by insufficient classification of participants with and without clinical depression. A majority of PD patients who had high depression scores were excluded from the analysis as they were receiving antidepressant and/or anxiolytic medications which could interfere with ERP sensitivity. Conclusions: The present study suggests that the Pz-P300, N400 and LPP are ERP markers relates to emotional dysfunction in PD. These findings thus advance current knowledge regarding the neurophysiological markers of a common neuropsychiatric deficit in PD.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom897
dc.relation.ispartofpageto904
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Affective Disorders
dc.relation.ispartofvolume245
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Chemistry (diagnostics)
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110302
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.titleDepression symptomatology correlates with event-related potentials in Parkinson's disease: An affective priming study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationDissanayaka, NNW; Au, TR; Angwin, AJ; Iyer, KK; O'Sullivan, JD; Byrne, GJ; Silburn, PA; Marsh, R; Mellick, GD; Copland, DA, Depression symptomatology correlates with event-related potentials in Parkinson's disease: An affective priming study, Journal of Affective Disorders, 2019, 245, pp. 897-904
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2019-09-06T03:44:44Z
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMellick, George


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